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We are Marines

I was going to update on the high temps, sand flea bites and tics but below is a much more simpler post. All is good-Semper

 

We are Marines. Many people don’t understand what we do as Marines nor do they really want to know. Many people are just thankful that we are out there. The force between them and evil. They are quick to chastise us or point out the rare occasions when we drift, however, they beg for us to go stand between them and fear.  In the very recent past, we have lost two Marines from our unit, the first of this deployment, many of the last few deployments.  They are warriors, school teachers and sons. They wanted to make a difference and they did. Now that we have grieve and have held a memorial, we put our helmets back on, push outside the wire and continue to keep the wolf at bay.  Why you ask? Because we are Marines.

God Bless them both and their families-Semper Fi


Daddy's Poem

Daddy's Poem

Her hair was up in a pony tail,
her favorite dress tied with a bow.
Today was Daddy's Day at school,
and she couldn't wait to go.
But her mommy tried to tell her,
that she probably should stay home
Why the kids might not understand,
if she went to school alone.
But she was not afraid;
she knew just what to say.
What to tell her classmates
of why he wasn't there today.
But still her mother worried,
for her to face this day alone.
And that was why once again,
she tried to keep her daughter home..

But the little girl went to school
eager to tell them all.
About a dad she never sees
a dad who never calls.
There were daddies along the wall in back, for everyone to meet.
Children squirming impatiently,
anxious in their seats
One by one the teacher called
a student from the class.
To introduce their daddy,
as seconds slowly passed.
At last the teacher called her name,
every child turned to stare.
Each of them was searching,
a man who wasn't there.

'Where's her daddy at?'
She heard a boy call out.
'She probably doesn't have one,'
another student dared to shout.
And from somewhere near the back,
she heard a daddy say,
'Looks like another deadbeat dad,
too busy to waste his day.'

The words did not offend her,
as she smiled up at her Mom.
And looked back at her teacher, who told her to go on.
And with hands behind her back,
slowly she began to speak.
And out from the mouth of a child,
came words incredibly unique.

'My Daddy couldn't be here,
because he lives so far away.
But I know he wishes he could be,
since this is such a special day.
And though you cannot meet him,
I wanted you to know.
All about my daddy,
and how much he loves me so.
He loved to tell me stories
he taught me to ride my bike.
He surprised me with pink roses,
and taught me to fly a kite.
We used to share fudge sundaes,
and ice cream in a cone
And though you cannot see him.
I'm not standing here alone.

'Cause my daddy's always with me,
even though we are apart
I know because he told me,
he'll forever be in my heart'
With that, her little hand reached up,
and lay across her chest.
Feeling her own heartbeat,
beneath her favorite dress.

And from somewhere there in the crowd of dads, her mother stood in
tears.
Proudly watching her daughter,

who was wise beyond her years.
For she stood up for the love
of a man not in her life.
Doing what was best for her,
doing what was right.
And when she dropped her hand back down, staring straight into the
crowd.
She finished with a voice so soft,
but its message clear and loud.

'I love my daddy very much,
he's my shining star.
And if he could, he'd be here,
but heaven's just too far.

You see he is a Marine
and died just this past year
When a roadside bomb hit his convoy
and taught Americans to fear.
But sometimes when I close my eyes,
it's like he never went away.'
And then she closed her eyes,
and saw him there that day.

And to her mother's amazement,
she witnessed with surprise.
A room full of daddies and children,
all starting to close their eyes.

Who knows what they saw before them,
who knows what they felt inside.
Perhaps for merely a second,
they saw him at her side.

'I know you're with me Daddy,'
to the silence she called out.
And what happened next made believers,
of those once filled with doubt.

Not one in that room could explain it,
for each of their eyes had been closed.
But there on the desk beside her,
was a fragrant long-stemmed pink rose.
And a child was blessed, if only for a moment, by the love of her
shining star.
And given the gift of believing,
that heaven is never too far.

They say it takes a minute to find a special person, an hour to
appreciate them, a day to love them, but then an entire life to forget
them.

Take the time...to live and love.

Until eternity.

God bless

There must be many children in the same boat as this little girl.
Thanks to our servicemen and women and their families for the sacrifice they are
making to keep our country Free.


Don't know if you've ever seen this.  A great lesson for all kids.

Back in September of 2005, on the first day of school, Martha Cothren, a
social studies school teacher at Robinson High School in Little Rock ,
did something not to be forgotten.

On the first day of school, with the permission of the school
superintendent, the principal and the building supervisor, she removed
all of the desks out of her classroom.

When the first period kids entered the room they discovered that there
were no desks.

Looking around, confused, they asked,
'Ms. Cothren, where're our desks?'

She replied, 'You can't have a desk until you tell me what you have done
to earn the right to sit at a desk.'

They thought, 'Well, maybe it's our grades.
'No,' she said.

'Maybe it's our behavior.'
She told them, 'No, it's not even your behavior'.

And so, they came and went, the first period, second period, third
period.  Still no desks in the classroom.

By early afternoon television news crews had started gathering in Ms.
Cothren's classroom to report about this crazy teacher who had taken all
the desks out of her room.

The final period of the day came and as the puzzled students found seats
on the floor of the desk less classroom.

Martha Cothren said, 'Throughout the day no one has been able to tell me
just what he/she has done to earn the right to sit at the desks that are
ordinarily found in this classroom. Now I am going to tell you.'

At this point, Martha Cothren went over to the door of her classroom
and opened it.

Twenty-seven (27) U.S. Veterans, all in uniforms, walked into that
classroom, each one carrying a school desk.

The Vets began placing the school desks in rows, and then they would walk over and stand alongside the wall.

By the time the last soldier had set the final desk in place those kids
started to understand, perhaps for the first time in their lives, just
how the right to sit at those desks had been earned.

Martha said, 'You didn't earn the right to sit at these desks.

These heroes did it for you. They placed the desks here for you.
Now, it's up to you to sit in them.

It is your responsibility to learn, to be
good students, to be good citizens.

They paid the price so that you
could have the freedom to get an education. Don't ever forget it.'

By the way, this is a true story.... If you can read this, thank a
teacher. If you read it in English, thank a soldier.

Yes, it really is a true story..